nprontheroad:

My visit to Shell’s Olympus drilling rig and platform in the Gulf of Mexico concluded today at “One Shell Square”. That’s where the oil company has offices in downtown New Orleans. 

We learned that drilling rigs in the Gulf of Mexico can cost up to $1.5 million a day to operate. For that reason the company spends a lot of effort trying to reduce what it calls NPT or “non-productive time”. 

We also saw the on-shore control room for Olympus (pictured above). Shell, BP and Chevron constructed an underwater fiber optic network from Mississippi to Texas in 2009. That allows workers onshore to constantly monitor what’s happening out on the rig. They can look at any of the 160 cameras on board and monitor all sorts of instrument readings to assist their co-workers. 

Finally we saw a place called “The Bridge”. Sadly this was not a Star Trek reference. This “team serves as a bridge between platform operators running equipment and problem-solving engineers”, according to Shell’s web site. This group collects 700 million pieces of data a day and then analyzes them for problems. When they notice something that appears out-of-whack, they alert others to see if something needs to be fixed. 

One big thing that has struck me during this trip is just how complicated it is to get oil out of the earth these days. A lot of the crude that’s easy for companies to extract is either gone or controlled by state-owned firms now. So that leaves companies like Shell out in the Gulf of Mexico tapping into reserves that require a lot of technology and money to reach. 

Thanks for joining me the last few days—I enjoyed it!

Jeff Brady

Part 2

(via npr)

nprontheroad:

The maximum capacity on Shell’s Olympus drilling rig and platform is 192 workers. That many people eat a lot of food—about 1650 pounds of meat every week. Included in that is about 785 pounds of beef, 370 pounds of chicken and 80 pounds of catfish.

Crews work a variety of schedules—two weeks on and then two weeks off is common. Those who work at night need quiet during the day. In the sleeping quarters you’ll see signs advising passersby that a “day sleeper” is inside. Crews share bedrooms—two or four to a room. Each bunk has its own television. 

The rig has an exercise room (shown above) and a game room that also has large-screen TVs and recliners. 

Tomorrow we visit Shell’s on-shore Deep Water Technology Centers in downtown New Orleans—more then… 

I love technology… even fossil fuel technology…

(via npr)

Demoing New Application

devopsreactions:

image

by chernandez1982

LOL… Oh this is so true… 

lamackers:

bjakuc:

lamackers:

wnderlst:

Colmar, France | Marcel Vintan

Want to go?

I most certainly do. Here is the beginnings of a France itinerary (suggestions welcome): Paris, Normandy, Colmar, Marseille, Nice… any place else? If we’re gonna dream, I say we dream big…

I’d like to hit Lyon as my friends will be living there next year. Other than that, I say we rent a car and go where the wind takes us and all the places in between!

lamackers:

bjakuc:

lamackers:

wnderlst:

Colmar, France | Marcel Vintan

Want to go?

I most certainly do. Here is the beginnings of a France itinerary (suggestions welcome): Paris, Normandy, Colmar, Marseille, Nice… any place else? If we’re gonna dream, I say we dream big…

I’d like to hit Lyon as my friends will be living there next year. Other than that, I say we rent a car and go where the wind takes us and all the places in between!

architecturia:

Golden Sunset - Sant lovely art

Oh lovely Greece…

architecturia:

Golden Sunset - Sant lovely art

Oh lovely Greece…

nprontheroad:

Goodbye Brazil. Thank you for being a wonderful host during a glorious month of soccer (or football). World Cup 2014 has ended after 64 matches with Germany crowned as the champion. 
Thank you for sharing your country with the world and with us as we traveled up and down the coast, to the Amazon and back. São Paulo, Natal, Manaus, Recife, Salvador and finally Rio de Janeiro. 
We loved our journey and documented all we saw: from the United States doing better than expected, to the tough living conditions in several host cities, the beautiful and controversial stadiums, the protests and the hopes of redemption after Brazil’s disappointing World Cup collapse. (We also forgive you for the difficult hotel Internet connections.)
There are so many good memories. We enjoyed your food. Tapioca, moqueca, acarajé and the fresh-squeezed orange juice seemingly for sale everywhere. The cab drivers (who round fares down!) always so friendly, full of advice and careful to fill out the receipts completely. And thankful for that one cabbie from Manaus who took us deep into the Amazon jungle for dinner and stayed to eat with us because he knew we’d never find a ride back to town.
Of course without our Brazilian-based assistants (Paula, Fernando and Catherine) none of this would have been possible. For being our translators, our fixers, keeping us out of trouble and helping us find the interesting voices and places we highlighted in our coverage.
So while the NPR sports crew exits, our Brazil correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro will continue reporting on the stories here — especially as we look ahead to the 2016 Rio Olympics. See you again soon, Brazil. Abraços.
(Photo by Russell Lewis/NPR taken 7-6-2014 in Rio de Janeiro)

Thank you NPR!

nprontheroad:

Goodbye Brazil. Thank you for being a wonderful host during a glorious month of soccer (or football). World Cup 2014 has ended after 64 matches with Germany crowned as the champion.

Thank you for sharing your country with the world and with us as we traveled up and down the coast, to the Amazon and back. São Paulo, Natal, Manaus, Recife, Salvador and finally Rio de Janeiro.

We loved our journey and documented all we saw: from the United States doing better than expected, to the tough living conditions in several host cities, the beautiful and controversial stadiums, the protests and the hopes of redemption after Brazil’s disappointing World Cup collapse. (We also forgive you for the difficult hotel Internet connections.)

There are so many good memories. We enjoyed your food. Tapioca, moqueca, acarajé and the fresh-squeezed orange juice seemingly for sale everywhere. The cab drivers (who round fares down!) always so friendly, full of advice and careful to fill out the receipts completely. And thankful for that one cabbie from Manaus who took us deep into the Amazon jungle for dinner and stayed to eat with us because he knew we’d never find a ride back to town.

Of course without our Brazilian-based assistants (Paula, Fernando and Catherine) none of this would have been possible. For being our translators, our fixers, keeping us out of trouble and helping us find the interesting voices and places we highlighted in our coverage.

So while the NPR sports crew exits, our Brazil correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro will continue reporting on the stories here — especially as we look ahead to the 2016 Rio Olympics. See you again soon, Brazil. Abraços.

(Photo by Russell Lewis/NPR taken 7-6-2014 in Rio de Janeiro)

Thank you NPR!

(via npr)

neuromorphogenesis:

The Science of Happiness: What data & biology reveal about our mood

While true happiness may have a different definition to each of us, science can give us a glimpse at the underlying biological factors behind happiness. From the food we eat to room temperature, there are thousands of factors that play a role in how our brains work and the moods that we are in. Understanding these factors can be helpful in achieving lasting happiness.

Infographic by Webpage FX

(via discoverynews)

architecturia:

Champs Elysees, Pari lovely art

Some day… You joining me Smiley?

architecturia:

Champs Elysees, Pari lovely art

Some day… You joining me Smiley?

buzzfeed:

You don’t need a grill to make delicious summer dishes!

Love my grill but these are cool…